IAKS All Time Award

for the Berlin Olympic Stadium

On 27 October the International Association for Sports and Leisure Facilities (IAKS) awarded an All Time Award for the Berlin Olympic Stadium at Koelnmesse’s Congress Centre North. The award was given in honor of both the operating company, Olympiastadion Berlin GmbH, and the designers of the extensive conversion (2000 to 2004), gmp – Architects von Gerkan, Marg and Partners, Berlin.

In preparation for the 2006 FIFA World Cup, the demanding task facing gmp – Architects von Gerkan, Marg and Partners was to carefully refurbish the building, which was listed as a historic monument, while also modernizing it into a multi-functional arena in accordance with modern requirements. The construction and design of the roof constituted a key element in the overall design. In order to be able to keep open the historic opening of the listed monument (with all its political implications) towards the adjoining Maifeld sports ground to the west, with its bell tower and Langemarckhalle (a National Socialist reference to the idea of a burial temple which, since 2006, has been used as a documentation center with a permanent exhibition entitled „Olympic Park – Historic Site“ and designed by gmp Architects), the designers decided against a closed ring construction. Instead, a steel tube space frame structure with a span of 68 meters and bearing on 20 very slender tree columns around the upper spectator ring covers all of the nearly 75,000 seats. With its delicate construction and choice of material – the skin of the roof is formed by a translucent membrane – the roof is in deliberate contrast to the solid structure of the historic building.

Since then, the architects have demonstrated their competence in the design of this type of building with numerous additional stadium projects such as those for the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa, the 2014 World Cup in Brazil and the UEFA 2012 European Championship (in Poland and Ukraine). In China they completed the Shanghai Oriental Sports Centre and the Universiade Sports Center amongst other projects, and construction on the SIP Sports Center in Suzhou has just started.

On 27 October the International Association for Sports and Leisure Facilities (IAKS) awarded an All Time Award for the Berlin Olympic Stadium at Koelnmesse’s Congress Centre North. The award was given in honor of both the operating company, Olympiastadion Berlin GmbH, and the designers of the extensive conversion (2000 to 2004), gmp – Architects von Gerkan, Marg and Partners, Berlin.

In preparation for the 2006 FIFA World Cup, the demanding task facing gmp – Architects von Gerkan, Marg and Partners was to carefully refurbish the building, which was listed as a historic monument, while also modernizing it into a multi-functional arena in accordance with modern requirements. The construction and design of the roof constituted a key element in the overall design. In order to be able to keep open the historic opening of the listed monument (with all its political implications) towards the adjoining Maifeld sports ground to the west, with its bell tower and Langemarckhalle (a National Socialist reference to the idea of a burial temple which, since 2006, has been used as a documentation center with a permanent exhibition entitled „Olympic Park – Historic Site“ and designed by gmp Architects), the designers decided against a closed ring construction. Instead, a steel tube space frame structure with a span of 68 meters and bearing on 20 very slender tree columns around the upper spectator ring covers all of the nearly 75,000 seats. With its delicate construction and choice of material – the skin of the roof is formed by a translucent membrane – the roof is in deliberate contrast to the solid structure of the historic building.

Since then, the architects have demonstrated their competence in the design of this type of building with numerous additional stadium projects such as those for the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa, the 2014 World Cup in Brazil and the UEFA 2012 European Championship (in Poland and Ukraine). In China they completed the Shanghai Oriental Sports Centre and the Universiade Sports Center amongst other projects, and construction on the SIP Sports Center in Suzhou has just started.

 

Exhibition at MoMA: Endless House

Intersections of Art and Architecture

The MoMA exhibition Endless House  considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as themes for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways.

Works from architects and artists created over a period of seven decades are shown, among them material of Endless House, a project designed by Freidrich Kiesler, which was never realized. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radić and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, Rachel Whiteread, and a recently purchased work of Annett Zinsmeister. Together these works demonstrate how the dwelling occupies a central place in a cultural exchange that crosses generations and disciplines.

The MoMA exhibition Endless House  considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as themes for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways.

Works from architects and artists created over a period of seven decades are shown, among them material of Endless House, a project designed by Freidrich Kiesler, which was never realized. Intriguing house designs—ranging from historical projects by Mies van der Rohe, Frank Gehry, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, to new acquisitions from Smiljan Radić and Asymptote Architecture—are juxtaposed with visions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Nauman, Mario Merz, Rachel Whiteread, and a recently purchased work of Annett Zinsmeister. Together these works demonstrate how the dwelling occupies a central place in a cultural exchange that crosses generations and disciplines.

 

MAKE CITY Festival

JOVIS is founding partner of MAKE CITY—Festival for Architecture and Urban Alternatives, which takes place in Berlin from June 11 to June 28. The Festival is addressing the current discourse on urban resources and urban planning in a time when investors take over large parts of Berlin, and hence its free spaces— its urban commons—become increasingly precious resources.

The Festival will embed itself throughout the city in diverse ways: it rethinks the back yard, climbs on roofs and asks, if high-rises of the future will be made out of wood. It looks back on the concept of “Electropolis” and envisions new forms of living. Over 100 founding partners are sponsors of the festival and took part in developing the program, which is available on www.makecity.berlin.

During the time of the festival over 30 curated studio talks and 40 uniquely devised city tours take place. The Czech Centre in the Wilhelmstrasse, Berlin Mitte, will be the place where the international discourse and exchange comes together. The festival invites partners to contribute to a variety of formats. MAKE CITY is decentralized; a city-wide conversation; one that forms cross-links between the architecture, art, and design scenes and makes new connections with the public. The formats will reflect the scales of urban design and engagement from the micro to the macro.

Park am Gleisdreieck, Berlin © Julien Lanoo

JOVIS is founding partner of MAKE CITY—Festival for Architecture and Urban Alternatives, which takes place in Berlin from June 11 to June 28. The Festival is addressing the current discourse on urban resources and urban planning in a time when investors take over large parts of Berlin, and hence its free spaces— its urban commons—become increasingly precious resources.

The Festival will embed itself throughout the city in diverse ways: it rethinks the back yard, climbs on roofs and asks, if high-rises of the future will be made out of wood. It looks back on the concept of “Electropolis” and envisions new forms of living. Over 100 founding partners are sponsors of the festival and took part in developing the program, which is available on www.makecity.berlin.

During the time of the festival over 30 curated studio talks and 40 uniquely devised city tours take place. The Czech Centre in the Wilhelmstrasse, Berlin Mitte, will be the place where the international discourse and exchange comes together. The festival invites partners to contribute to a variety of formats. MAKE CITY is decentralized; a city-wide conversation; one that forms cross-links between the architecture, art, and design scenes and makes new connections with the public. The formats will reflect the scales of urban design and engagement from the micro to the macro.

Park am Gleisdreieck, Berlin © Julien Lanoo
 

Expo Milano—Japan Pavilion

Atsushi Kitagawara Architects have designed the Japan pavilion for the Expo Milano 2015. The Expo will take place from May 1 to October 31, 2015 in Milan under the theme ”Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life”. Titled ”Harmonious Diversity” the exhibition at Japan pavilion represents Japan’s knowledge, experience, and techniques within the produce and food culture. The pavilion architecture fuses Japan’s traditional culture and materials with modern technologies, such as systems for energy conservation. More about the pavilion and its architecture can be found here.

Atsushi Kitagawara Architects have designed the Japan pavilion for the Expo Milano 2015. The Expo will take place from May 1 to October 31, 2015 in Milan under the theme ”Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life”. Titled ”Harmonious Diversity” the exhibition at Japan pavilion represents Japan’s knowledge, experience, and techniques within the produce and food culture. The pavilion architecture fuses Japan’s traditional culture and materials with modern technologies, such as systems for energy conservation. More about the pavilion and its architecture can be found here.

 

Reframing the Urban: Cities and their global impact

Neil Brenner, Professor of Urban Theory and Director of Urban Theory Lab (UTL) at Harvard Graduate School of Design, talks with Peter Mares, University of Melbourne, about the phenomenon of ”urbanization”. The talk is available as a podcast on urbantheorylab.net.

As more and more people move into cities, we live in an urban age—this is a common assumption. Brenner opposes this definition of the “urban age”, which is based on a binary opposition between city and countryside. He argues instead that it is necessary to look beyond this notion of the rural/urban divide, since it cannot encompass the differences in processes of urbanization. He proposes a redefinition of the concept of “urbanization”, which acknowledges that rural territories—the so-called hinterland—play a fundamental part in supplying cities with resources and are thus essential to the process. Urbanization has already reached the whole planet, not only so-called “urban” regions: ”I do believe that we live in an urban world and in an urbanised planet, but in order to understand the way in which that's the case we oftentimes have to look far beyond the city limits in order to see the ways in which landscapes, environments, territories are being transformed to support the current form of urbanisation.“—Read more at: upclose.unimelb.edu.au

The book Implosions / Explosions, edited by Neil Brenner, looks at processes of urbanization across places, regions, territories, continents, and oceans up to the planetary scale.

Neil Brenner, Professor of Urban Theory and Director of Urban Theory Lab (UTL) at Harvard Graduate School of Design, talks with Peter Mares, University of Melbourne, about the phenomenon of ”urbanization”. The talk is available as a podcast on urbantheorylab.net.

As more and more people move into cities, we live in an urban age—this is a common assumption. Brenner opposes this definition of the “urban age”, which is based on a binary opposition between city and countryside. He argues instead that it is necessary to look beyond this notion of the rural/urban divide, since it cannot encompass the differences in processes of urbanization. He proposes a redefinition of the concept of “urbanization”, which acknowledges that rural territories—the so-called hinterland—play a fundamental part in supplying cities with resources and are thus essential to the process. Urbanization has already reached the whole planet, not only so-called “urban” regions: ”I do believe that we live in an urban world and in an urbanised planet, but in order to understand the way in which that's the case we oftentimes have to look far beyond the city limits in order to see the ways in which landscapes, environments, territories are being transformed to support the current form of urbanisation.“—Read more at: upclose.unimelb.edu.au

The book Implosions / Explosions, edited by Neil Brenner, looks at processes of urbanization across places, regions, territories, continents, and oceans up to the planetary scale.

 

New Series: gmp FOCUS

Our new series gmp FOCUS documents an exemplary selection of buildings by architecture firm gmp—von Gerkan, Marg and Partner. Each volume presents one building by means of detailed texts and photo galleries by renowned culture journalists, architecture critics, and photographers. Among others, the publications focus on the Hanoi Museum of Vietnam, the Chongqing Grand Theater in China, the State Ballet School in Berlin, and the Hans-Sachs-Haus in Gelsenkirchen.

The architecture partnership gmp was founded in 1965 by Meinhard von Gerkan and Volkwin Marg. gmp became known especially on account of its airport architecture: in 1975, Berlin-Tegel was opened as a drive-in airport. It is not only their projects such as the exhibition center Neue Messe Leipzig, the reconstruction and roofing of the Berlin Olympic Stadium, or the Berlin Central Station that have gained international acclaim. In China, they have realized the trade fair and congress centers in Nanning and Shenzhen, as well as the Universiade Sports Center and the Oriental Sports Center in Shanghai. Further buildings include the opera houses in Chongqing, Qingdao, and Tianjin, as well as the National Museum of China in Beijing and the new West Railway Station in Tianjin. gmp has been awarded more than 590 prizes in national and international competitions, of which more than 310 first prizes, and numerous distinctions for exemplary architecture. They have realized more than 370 buildings up until today.

Our new series gmp FOCUS documents an exemplary selection of buildings by architecture firm gmp—von Gerkan, Marg and Partner. Each volume presents one building by means of detailed texts and photo galleries by renowned culture journalists, architecture critics, and photographers. Among others, the publications focus on the Hanoi Museum of Vietnam, the Chongqing Grand Theater in China, the State Ballet School in Berlin, and the Hans-Sachs-Haus in Gelsenkirchen.

The architecture partnership gmp was founded in 1965 by Meinhard von Gerkan and Volkwin Marg. gmp became known especially on account of its airport architecture: in 1975, Berlin-Tegel was opened as a drive-in airport. It is not only their projects such as the exhibition center Neue Messe Leipzig, the reconstruction and roofing of the Berlin Olympic Stadium, or the Berlin Central Station that have gained international acclaim. In China, they have realized the trade fair and congress centers in Nanning and Shenzhen, as well as the Universiade Sports Center and the Oriental Sports Center in Shanghai. Further buildings include the opera houses in Chongqing, Qingdao, and Tianjin, as well as the National Museum of China in Beijing and the new West Railway Station in Tianjin. gmp has been awarded more than 590 prizes in national and international competitions, of which more than 310 first prizes, and numerous distinctions for exemplary architecture. They have realized more than 370 buildings up until today.

 

How Do We Create Cities Together?

„How do we create cities together?“—Richard Sennett, Professor of Sociology at London School of Economics and Political Science, Regula Lüscher, State Senate Department Director of Berlin, Marcos Rosa, architect, Sao Paolo, and Stefan Horn, urban dialogues, Berlin, discussed this question together with Kristien Ring, architect and founder of AA Projects, Berlin.

Richard Sennett’s keynote and the following discussion focused on the relation between top down planning and bottom up initiatives: How can citizens be integrated in processes of urban development? What are the advantages of bottom up projects and what are their limits? How can community projects have an impact on the city beyond the confines of the particular neighborhood?

The lecture and discussion took place at March 31, 2015. The book Handmade Urbanism. From Community Initiatives to Participatory Models, edited by Marcos L. Rosa and Ute Weiland, also focuses on the role of participatory methods in urban development. It presents 15 exemplary projects realized mostly in less favored areas of five major cities in emerging countries, examining the potential of urban transformation embedded in community initiatives.

„How do we create cities together?“—Richard Sennett, Professor of Sociology at London School of Economics and Political Science, Regula Lüscher, State Senate Department Director of Berlin, Marcos Rosa, architect, Sao Paolo, and Stefan Horn, urban dialogues, Berlin, discussed this question together with Kristien Ring, architect and founder of AA Projects, Berlin.

Richard Sennett’s keynote and the following discussion focused on the relation between top down planning and bottom up initiatives: How can citizens be integrated in processes of urban development? What are the advantages of bottom up projects and what are their limits? How can community projects have an impact on the city beyond the confines of the particular neighborhood?

The lecture and discussion took place at March 31, 2015. The book Handmade Urbanism. From Community Initiatives to Participatory Models, edited by Marcos L. Rosa and Ute Weiland, also focuses on the role of participatory methods in urban development. It presents 15 exemplary projects realized mostly in less favored areas of five major cities in emerging countries, examining the potential of urban transformation embedded in community initiatives.

 

Design Award Wüstenrot Foundation

The architecture firm Lederer Ragnarsdóttir Oei received the design award of the national competition of the Wüstenrot foundation “Building culture in Germany” (Baukultur in Deutschland) for the Hospitalhof in Stuttgart—a center used by the evangelical church in Stuttgart for culture, art, spirituality, and education. Among other things, the new building convinced the jury because of its harmonious relation with the existing layout and buildings of the neighborhood. You can find a detailed description and images of the Hospitalhof on LRO’s website.

The Wüstenrot foundation awarded 14 projects in the competition, which will be exhibited between February 24 and March 27, 2015 at BDA (Bund Deutscher Architekten), Zeppelin Carré, Friedrichstraße 5, 70174 Stuttgart.

The architecture firm Lederer Ragnarsdóttir Oei received the design award of the national competition of the Wüstenrot foundation “Building culture in Germany” (Baukultur in Deutschland) for the Hospitalhof in Stuttgart—a center used by the evangelical church in Stuttgart for culture, art, spirituality, and education. Among other things, the new building convinced the jury because of its harmonious relation with the existing layout and buildings of the neighborhood. You can find a detailed description and images of the Hospitalhof on LRO’s website.

The Wüstenrot foundation awarded 14 projects in the competition, which will be exhibited between February 24 and March 27, 2015 at BDA (Bund Deutscher Architekten), Zeppelin Carré, Friedrichstraße 5, 70174 Stuttgart.

 

Jan Gehl—Cities for People

On February 18 the Danish architect and city planner Jan Gehl talked about his principles in urban planning, which focus on the human scale. He presented numerous international projects that have integrated these principles—among others his hometown Copenhagen.

The event was organized in collaboration with the Alfred-Herrhausen-Society to present the first German edition of Gehl’s international bestseller Cities for People (Städte für Menschen).

For more than 40 years, the architect and city planner Jan Gehl has been involved in redesigning or creating new designs for squares, streets, even entire city districts, for the benefit of the residents. He bases himself on insights that he has gained through many years of studying city situations in various countries. By observing megacities in detail himself, Gehl develops methods and strategies for bringing significant positive change to dysfunctional and inhospitable urban landscapes. The most important principle behind Jan Gehl’s urban planning on a human scale is that the urban space has to be experienced at the speed of a pedestrian, instead of from a vehicle. This is the only way to succeed in making both traditional metropolises and rapidly growing cities in developing and emerging countries into “cities for people”.

On February 18 the Danish architect and city planner Jan Gehl talked about his principles in urban planning, which focus on the human scale. He presented numerous international projects that have integrated these principles—among others his hometown Copenhagen.

The event was organized in collaboration with the Alfred-Herrhausen-Society to present the first German edition of Gehl’s international bestseller Cities for People (Städte für Menschen).

For more than 40 years, the architect and city planner Jan Gehl has been involved in redesigning or creating new designs for squares, streets, even entire city districts, for the benefit of the residents. He bases himself on insights that he has gained through many years of studying city situations in various countries. By observing megacities in detail himself, Gehl develops methods and strategies for bringing significant positive change to dysfunctional and inhospitable urban landscapes. The most important principle behind Jan Gehl’s urban planning on a human scale is that the urban space has to be experienced at the speed of a pedestrian, instead of from a vehicle. This is the only way to succeed in making both traditional metropolises and rapidly growing cities in developing and emerging countries into “cities for people”.

 

Architecture Magazine Speech: Now Available at JOVIS

The bilingual architecture magazine speech: is now part of the JOVIS program: Each issue of the international magazine focuses on one topic relevant to modern architecture, highlighting it from different perspectives including theoretical and practical issues, history, and relevance, and discussing it in depth through international and Russian projects. All texts are written in Russian and English and illustrated with numerous graphics.

The first issue in 2015 analyzes the metro as a distinctive architectural type and a unique public space. The modern metro has ceased to be simply a means of getting to where you need to be by the shortest route; more than any other kind of public transport, it today determines the architectural image of large cities and the comfort of their urban environment. speech: 13 looks at the layout and design, transport infrastructure, as well as innovative technologies and materials using examples of metro stations from all over the world, which have been built in the last three years.

speech: (English and Russian) is published twice a year; up from issue 13 in cooperation with JOVIS Publishers. Issues 1–12 are available on inquiry through JOVIS Publishers.

The bilingual architecture magazine speech: is now part of the JOVIS program: Each issue of the international magazine focuses on one topic relevant to modern architecture, highlighting it from different perspectives including theoretical and practical issues, history, and relevance, and discussing it in depth through international and Russian projects. All texts are written in Russian and English and illustrated with numerous graphics.

The first issue in 2015 analyzes the metro as a distinctive architectural type and a unique public space. The modern metro has ceased to be simply a means of getting to where you need to be by the shortest route; more than any other kind of public transport, it today determines the architectural image of large cities and the comfort of their urban environment. speech: 13 looks at the layout and design, transport infrastructure, as well as innovative technologies and materials using examples of metro stations from all over the world, which have been built in the last three years.

speech: (English and Russian) is published twice a year; up from issue 13 in cooperation with JOVIS Publishers. Issues 1–12 are available on inquiry through JOVIS Publishers.